RESOLVING THE DISCONNECT BETWEEN THE WORDS OF THE STORED COMMUNICATIONS ACT AND THE FOURTH AMENDMENT: A POLICY ARGUMENT

By: Aaron Hsieh

I. Introduction

The Digital Revolution, also referred to as the Third Industrial Revolution, is a period during the latter half of the 20th century characterized by sweeping changes brought about by new digital computing and communication technology.[1]  At the core of the Digital Revolution was the mass production and widespread use of digital technology, including the computer, cellular phone, and most importantly, the Internet.[2]

Continue reading “RESOLVING THE DISCONNECT BETWEEN THE WORDS OF THE STORED COMMUNICATIONS ACT AND THE FOURTH AMENDMENT: A POLICY ARGUMENT”

MICROSOFT AND THE LIKES’ HEADACHE: IN THE WAKE OF THE SURPRISING JUDGMENT OF THE COURT OF JUSTICE OF THE EU IN ITS 5TH ANNIVERSARY

By: Michal Chudzik*

I. Introduction

When the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union pushed through the Directive 2009/24/EC of 23 April 2009 on the Legal Protection of Computer Programs (Directive 2009/24),[1] everybody thought that the real purpose of the Act was the protection of the computer programs, and by implication, protection of the right holders.  Only a few, if anyone, could predict otherwise.  The surprise this time, as many times in the past, came from the chambers—this time mighty Grand Chamber—of the Court of Justice of the European Union (henceforth the “CJEU” or the “Court”), who, among other things, overlooked the rule of primacy of international agreements and managed to define “nothing” as a “copy.” Continue reading “MICROSOFT AND THE LIKES’ HEADACHE: IN THE WAKE OF THE SURPRISING JUDGMENT OF THE COURT OF JUSTICE OF THE EU IN ITS 5TH ANNIVERSARY”

INTER PARTES REVIEW: AN IP POWER SWITCH

By: Tyler Train*

I. Introduction

1. The Inception of Inter Partes Review

On September 16, 2011, President Barack Obama signed the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA), drastically altering the patent law landscape.  One of the most significant impacts of this new legislation was the change in post-grant patent validity challenge proceedings from inter partes reexamination (Reexamination) to inter partes review (IPR), which took effect on September 16, 2012.[1]  IPR was instituted “to establish a more efficient and streamlined patent system.”[2]  Prior to the implementation of IPR, Reexamination was criticized and underutilized for its numerous shortcomings including, inter alia: prolonged timelines for each proceeding (lasting up to eight years with appeal); limiting the petitioner’s[3] involvement in the process; and failing to attain decisive outcomes.[4]  As a result, Congress created a more time-sensitive and adjudicative proceeding in IPR to be held by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB).  A hallmark of this transition is that Congress transformed the post-grant proceeding “from an examinational to an adjudicative proceeding.”[5]  The changes affect the backdrop of virtually all patent disputes arising after 2012.  This Article will provide an analysis of how IPR affects bargaining power in patent settlement negotiations.[6]

Continue reading “INTER PARTES REVIEW: AN IP POWER SWITCH”